女生失去第一次身体有变化吗

女生失去第一次身体有变化吗All things literary in Texas

Monday, June 29, 2020

Monday Roundup: Texas Literary Calendar June 29-July 5, 2020

Bookish goings-on in Texas for the week of June 29-July 5, 2020, compiled exclusively for Lone Star Literary Life by Texas Book Lover.   

Most events are still online via Facebook Live, Instagram Live, Zoom, and other venues. 

For a complete calendar of bookish events in Texas this week, including special events, daily listings, and exhibits, visit the GO! Calendar at Lone Star Lit

Sunday, June 28, 2020

Lone Star Literary Life - June 28, 2020

This Sunday morning and every Sunday morning, the new edition of Lone Star Literary Life is hot off the pixels!  

Follow the link for the latest Texas bookish news, reviews, interviews, and goings-on, then subscribe to the newsletter--it's free!

Friday, June 26, 2020

Author Interview & Giveaway: ALL THINGS LEFT WILD

ALL THINGS LEFT WILD
by
James Wade

Genre: Adventure / Rural Fiction / Coming of Age
Publisher: Blackstone Publishing
Publication Date: June 16, 2020
Number of Pages: 304 pages

Scroll down for the giveaway!


After an attempted horse theft goes tragically wrong, sixteen-year-old Caleb Bentley is on the run with his mean-spirited older brother across the American Southwest at the turn of the twentieth century. Caleb's moral compass and inner courage will be tested as they travel the harsh terrain and encounter those who have carved out a life there, for good or ill. 

Wealthy and bookish Randall Dawson, out of place in this rugged and violent country, is begrudgingly chasing after the Bentley brothers. With little sense of how to survive, much less how to take his revenge, Randall meets Charlotte, a woman experienced in the deadly ways of life in the West. Together they navigate the murky values of vigilante justice.


Powerful and atmospheric, lyrical and fast-paced, All Things Left Wild is a coming-of-age for one man, a midlife odyssey for the other, and an illustration of the violence and corruption prevalent in our fast-expanding country. It artfully sketches the magnificence of the American West as mirrored in the human soul.

PRAISE for All Things Left Wild:
"A debut full of atmosphere and awe. Wade gives emotional depth to his dust-covered characters and creates an image of the American West that is harsh and unforgiving, but -- like All Things Left Wild -- not without hope." — Texas Literary Hall of Fame member Sarah Bird, Daughter of a Daughter of a Queen

"James Wade has delivered a McCarthy-esque odyssey with an Elmore Leonard ear for dialogue. All Things Left Wild moves like a coyote across this cracked-earth landscape—relentlessly paced and ambitiously hungry." — Edgar Award finalist David Joy, When These Mountains Burn
CLICK TO PURCHASE:
  Amazon ┃ BookPeople ┃ Bookshop.orgIndieBound
    


Interviewwith James Wade
Author of AllThings Left Wild


How has being a Texan (or Texas)influenced your writing?

Texas has produced historically good writers, from J.Frank Dobie and James Michener to Edna Ferber and Molly Ivins, and so many others.And as cliché as it sounds, Texas authors, more often than not, have that hard-scrabbletint to their work. Also, our state is a big place, so there are differentstyles of Texas writing—from Joe Lansdale’s East Texas capers to LarryMcMurtry’s wind-swept stories of the Texas Plains. As a reader and a writer,Texas encourages you to explore different genres, different geography, anddifferent voices. I was lucky to grow up with so many literary influences frommy home state. 


Who are some of the authors you feelwere influential in your work? 

So many. The first few to come to mind are CormacMcCarthy, Flannery O’Connor, Larry McMurtry, and Owen Egerton.

What are some day jobs that you haveheld? Have any of them impacted your writing?

People say this a lot, but I’ve had almost every jobthere is, and every one of them has made my writing more informed. I’ve workedin a warehouse, in a handful of kitchens, in retail, and at a call center. I’vedelivered beauty supplies to salons, taught summer school to Hispanic studentslearning English, and worked at a bank for almost a whole month. I’ve worked onlobby projects for the Texas Water Development Board, served as a legislative directorin the Texas House of Representatives, and spent a couple years as a spokespersonfor the Texas Department of Transportation. I’ve written and edited for onlinenews outlets and magazines, and my longest job was as a reporter at my hometownnewspaper, the Lufkin Daily News. Every one of those positions exposedme to different industries, different people, and different circumstances, whichall play a part in storytelling.

How has your formal education influencedor impacted your writing?

My informal education has had a much larger impacton my writing. And even though I only owe student loans for my formaleducation, I had to pay for the other in plenty of ways.

What did you find most useful inlearning to write for publication? What was least useful or most destructive?

The most useful advice I’ve ever received (thanks,Joe) was to put my ass in the chair and write. That’s it. That’s the endgame.Other things that helped: striving for routine and discipline, and also readingas much as I could. Oh, and coffee. Lots of coffee.

I don’t know that there’s a lot of destructiveadvice or practices out there, but certainly there are things that work forsome folks and not for others. I’m not a big workshop guy. It doesn’t help meto have a room full of people tell me how they would’ve written it. My wife wasthe only person to read All Things Left Wild before I sent it to myagent. Feedback can be valuable for writers, but at some point, you have totrust yourself, close your eyes, and hit send. 




James Wade lives and writes in Austin, Texas, with his wife and daughter. He has had twenty short stories published in various literary magazines and journals. He is the winner of the Writers' League of Texas Manuscript Contest and a finalist of the Tethered by Letters Short Fiction Contest. All Things Left Wild is his debut novel.

  Website ║ Facebook Blog 
 Instagram ║  YouTube ║ Goodreads 









---------------------------------
GIVEAWAY! GIVEAWAY! GIVEAWAY!
TWO WINNERS: A signed copy of All Things Left Wild
JUNE 18-28, 2020
(US ONLY)

FOR DIRECT LINKS TO EACH POST ON THIS TOUR, UPDATED DAILY, 
or visit the blogs directly:

6/18/20
Author Video
6/18/20
Excerpt
6/19/20
Review
6/19/20
Scrapbook
6/20/20
Review
6/21/20
Author Interview
6/22/20
Review
6/23/20
Review
6/23/20
Guest Post
6/24/20
Top Ten
6/25/20
Review
6/25/20
Playlist
6/26/20
Author Interview
6/27/20
Review
6/27/20
Review

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Tuesday, June 23, 2020

Promo & Giveaway: WHAT MOMMA LEFT BEHIND

WHAT MOMMA LEFT BEHIND
by
Cindy K. Sproles

Christian Historical Fiction
Publisher: Revell
Date of Publication: June 2, 2020
Number of Pages: 256

Scroll down for the giveaway!


Worie Dressar is seventeen years old when influenza and typhoid ravage her Appalachian Mountain community in 1877, leaving behind a growing number of orphaned children with no way to care for themselves. Worie's mother has been secretly feeding a number of these little ones on Sourwood Mountain. But when she dies suddenly, Worie is left to figure out why and how she was caring for them.

Plagued with two good-for-nothing brothers—one greedy and the other a drunkard—Worie fights to save her home and the orphaned children now in her begrudging care. Along the way, she will discover the beauty of unconditional love and the power of forgiveness as she cares for all of Momma's children.

Storyteller and popular speaker Cindy K. Sproles pens a tender novel full of sacrifice, heartache, and courage in the face of overwhelming obstacles.

PRAISE for What Momma Left Behind: 

"Worie Dressar isn't your typical heroine
she's tough, she's opinionated, and she's loud. But at her core she wants to love and be lovedjust like the rest of us. Cindy's special talent is in telling about life the way it ishard parts and allwhile preserving the beauty and wonder of love shining through even the darkest night." Sarah Loudin Thomas, Christy Award-nominated author of Miracle in a Dry Season

"Seldom does a story move me to tears and encourage me to examine my life. A powerful story. Highly recommended." 
DiAnn Mills, author of Fatal Strike

"Cindy Sproles has a way of placing readers inside the Blue Ridge Mountains. Her ability to transport readers into her Appalachian adventures is nothing short of genius. Leaving us hanging on every word, Cindy writes with feeling and incredible historical knowledge. This book is a must-read!" 
LaTan Murphy, writer, speaker, author of Courageous Women of the Bible


Cindy K. Sproles is the cofounder of Christian Devotions Ministries. An author, storyteller, and popular speaker, Cindy teaches at writers’ conferences across the country and directs the Asheville Christian Writers Conference in North Carolina. Editor of ChristianDevotions.us and managing editor for Straight Street Books and SonRise Devotionals, Cindy has a BA in business and journalism and lives in the mountains of East Tennessee with her family. 

Website ║ Facebook  Twitter  Goodreads







-------------------------------------
GIVEAWAY!  GIVEAWAY!  GIVEAWAY!
THREE WINNERS 
First Winner: Copy of What Momma Left Behind + $20 B&N Gift Card 
Second Winner: Copy of What Momma Left Behind  + $5 Starbucks Gift Card 
Third Winner: Copy of What Momma Left Behind
 June 23-July 3, 2020
CLICK TO VISIT THE LONE STAR LITERARY LIFE TOUR PAGE
FOR DIRECT LINKS TO EACH POST ON THIS TOUR, UPDATED DAILY. 
Or, visit the blogs directly:

6/23/20
Book Trailer
6/23/20
Author Video
6/24/20
Review
6/25/20
Author Interview
6/26/20
Review
6/27/20
Excerpt
6/28/20
Author Interview
6/29/20
Review
6/30/20
Excerpt
7/1/20
Review
7/2/20
Review



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Monday, June 22, 2020

Monday Roundup: Texas Literary Calendar June 22-28, 2020

Bookish goings-on in Texas for the week of June 22-28, 2020, compiled exclusively for Lone Star Literary Life by Texas Book Lover.   

Special events this week include the Austin African American Book Festival, Writers' League of Texas's first UnConference, and virtual camps for young writers with Writing Workshops Dallas. Most events are still online via Facebook Live, Instagram Live, Zoom, and other venues. 

For a complete calendar of bookish events in Texas this week, including special events, daily listings, and exhibits, visit the GO! Calendar at Lone Star Lit

Sunday, June 21, 2020

Lone Star Literary Life -June 21, 2020

This Sunday morning and every Sunday morning, the new edition of Lone Star Literary Life is hot off the pixels!  

Follow the link for the latest Texas bookish news, reviews, interviews, and goings-on, then subscribe to the newsletter--it's free!

Saturday, June 20, 2020

Excerpt & Giveaway: THE KEY TO EVERYTHING

THE KEY TO EVERYTHING
by
Valerie Fraser Luesse

Contemporary Christian Romance
Publisher: Revell
Date of Publication: June 2, 2020
Number of Pages: 352

Scroll down for the giveaway!


Based on a true story, Valerie Fraser Luesse’s new novel takes readers on an incredible journey of self-discovery. The poignant prose, enchanting characters, and captivating settings in The Key to Everything make this a moving story that readers won’t soon forget. Peyton Cabot’s fifteenth year will be a painful and transformative one. His father, the reluctant head of a moneyed Savannah family, has come home from WWII a troubled vet, drowning his demons in bourbon, and distancing himself from his son. When a tragic accident separates Peyton from his parents, and the girl of his dreams seems out of reach, he struggles to cope with a young life upended.

Pushed to his limit, Peyton makes a daring decision: he will retrace a slice of the journey his father took at fifteen by riding his bicycle all the way from St. Augustine to Key West, Florida. Part loving tribute, part search for self, Peyton’s journey will unlock more than he ever could have imagined, including the key to his distant father, a calling that will shape the rest of his life, and the realization that he’s willing to risk absolutely everything for the girl he loves.

CLICK TO ORDER ON:
  AMAZON ? BARNES & NOBLE
CHRISTIANBOOK.COM ? INDIEBOUND  



TheKey to Everything, Excerpt I
ChapterOne

Uncle Julian, the middle son, was doing what he alwaysdid—trying to sell Granddaddy Cabot on one of his big ideas: “We could parceloff a thousand acres over by Reidsville and turn it into a residentialdevelopment. We’d make a fortune. Can’t you see that?”

“Julian, Reidsville’s not close enough to anything—notAtlanta, not Savannah. All those vets settin’ up housekeepin’ want to be closeto a city where they can find work.”

Nothing about Peyton’s Uncle Julian was genuine—not hissmile, not his concern, and certainly not his devotion to the family. Wheneverthere was any heavy lifting to be done, you could count on Uncle Julian to beneeded elsewhere. Peyton’s mother had once said that he was “doomed to gothrough life feeling cheated” because he believed any good fortune that fell onsomeone else rightly belonged to him. He fancied himself a statesman but so farcouldn’t even win a seat on the Savannah city council.

Peyton spotted two of his cousins on a quilt underneath theGhost Oak and decided to join them. Their grandfather had named the tree longago, and the moniker was apt. Sit beneath it on a breezy night—better yet, astormy one—and the rustle of leaves did indeed sound like a swirl of specterscommuning overhead. When they were children, Peyton and his cousins would dareeach other to sit under the tree on windy evenings while the others hid in theazaleas, calling out into the darkness, “Ooooooooo, I am the ghost of ErnestineCabot, dead from the fever of 1824 . . . Ooooooooo, I am Ol’ Rawhead, swampmonster of the Okefenokee . . .”

Peyton had never been afraid of the family ghosts or thetree they supposedly haunted. There was something to be discovered way up inthose branches, and he had always been more curious than fearful.

Stepping off the porch, he dipped himself some homemade icecream from a wooden freezer that was probably older than he was and sat down onthe quilt with his cousins Prentiss and Winston.

“Somebody’s goin’ home mighty early.” Prentiss noddedtoward Peyton’s mother, who was walking slowly up a dirt road that led from themain house to a pretty lakeside cottage about a quarter mile away.

Peyton watched his mother’s back as she moved farther andfarther away from the family, now and again raising a hand to her face. Justthen his father appeared, following a path that led from the back of the house,through a pecan grove, and out to the stables. In one hand was a highballglass, already filled. The other held his ever-present companion since he hadcome home from the Pacific, a bottle of bourbon.

Peyton’s aunts said it was “the worst kind of stupid” forthe Army to draft men in their thirties, but once everybody younger was alreadyover there, they had no choice. Peyton’s father was gone for just over a yearbefore the Japanese surrendered, but by then the war had done its damage. Thewar was still doing its damage.

“Don’t look good, does it?” Winston asked him.

“No,” Peyton said, watching his father disappear into thepecan trees.

Winston swatted at a bee circling his head. “Hey, Peyton,how come you didn’t bring Lisa?”

“To face the whole clan? Way too early for that. Mightscare her off.” Peyton finished his ice cream and stretched out on the quilt.Closing his eyes against the sun filtering through the branches overhead, hepictured the girl who was never far from his thoughts.

Lisa Wallace had transferred to his school in January, whenher family moved to Savannah from Augusta. She was the prettiest girl in thewhole town, the prettiest girl Peyton had ever seen. But there was more to herthan that. For one thing, she didn’t flirt, a rarity in a Georgia beauty. Thenagain, she didn’t have to. Every boy in school wanted to go out with her. Herhair was deep auburn and fell in long glossy waves down her back. Her eyes wereblue, with just a hint of green, and she had a complexion like ice cream.

The minute she walked into his homeroom class, he knew. Hefelt it in his gut or his heart or whatever you want to call it. While all theother guys were working up their nerve, Peyton made a beeline for Lisa in thelunchroom that first day and offered to carry her tray to her table. She hadsmiled up at him and said, “You don’t waste any time, do you?”

As beautiful as she was, Lisa wasn’t interested in sittingon anybody’s pedestal and looking pretty. Once, Peyton had invited her to askeet shoot Winston put together. After watching all the guys complete theirfirst round, Lisa had tapped him on the shoulder and said, “Don’t I get aturn?” He handed her his gun and watched her take down every clay.

Peyton often found her sitting next to unpopular kids inthe cafeteria so they wouldn’t feel lonesome. One girl in their class was alittle slow and didn’t have the nerve to ask the teachers questions, so shecame to Lisa, who would spend her whole study hall tutoring instead of doingher own homework. When Lisa was excited about something, she talked with herhands, and Peyton found himself staring at them as they lithely fluttered inthe air, waving her timid pupil toward the correct answer.

Winston interrupted his reverie. “Lisa and Peyton sittin’in a tree, k-i-s-s-i-n-g. First comes love, then comes marriage—”

“Oh, shut up, Winston.” Peyton threw an acorn at him.

The truth was, he was already thinking about marryingLisa—daydreaming about it anyway. He had asked her out right after she moved toSavannah and just about every weekend since. Only a month ago, he had taken herto the spring formal, when his whole life seemed as close to perfect as itwould ever get . . .

Again his cousins pulled him away from Lisa and back intothe fray of a Cabot family picnic. “Listen—here it comes,” Prentiss was saying,pointing toward the porch.


Toread Excerpt 2, visit All the Ups and Downs on June 21






Valerie Fraser Luesse is the bestselling author of Missing Isaac and Almost Home, as well as an award-winning magazine writer best known for her feature stories and essays in Southern Living, where she is currently senior travel editor. Specializing in stories about unique pockets of Southern culture, Luesse received the 2009 Writer of the Year award from the Southeast Tourism Society for her editorial section on Hurricane Katrina recovery in Mississippi and Louisiana. A graduate of Auburn University and Baylor University, she lives in Birmingham, Alabama, with her husband, Dave. 


Website ║ Facebook  ║ Blog 



-------------------------------------
GIVEAWAY!  GIVEAWAY!  GIVEAWAY!
THREE WINNERS 
One Winner: Copy of The Key to Everything, Necklace, $25 B&N Gift Card; 
Two Winners: Copy of The Key to Everything + $10 Starbucks Gift Card
June16-26, 2020
CLICK TO VISIT THE LONE STAR LITERARY LIFE TOUR PAGE FOR DIRECT LINKS TO EACH POST ON THIS TOUR, UPDATED DAILY. 
Or, visit the blogs directly:


6/16/20
Author Interview
6/16/20
BONUS Post
6/17/20
Review
6/18/20
Guest Post
6/19/20
Review
6/20/20
Excerpt
6/21/20
Excerpt
6/22/20
Review
6/23/20
Author Interview
6/24/20
Review
6/25/20
Review


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